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Blandford to deliver 2011 Misel

Roger Blandford
Roger Blandford, Stanford University
                                                       

Professor Roger Blandford, Stanford University, will deliver the 2011 Misel Family Lecture, "The Dark Side of the Universe," at 7:00 p.m. on Tuesday, September 20th in the McNamara Alumni Center, Memorial Hall.

His talk will examine our understanding of the universe as it undergoes a revolution. Astronomical measurements have demonstrated that about 21% of universe is in the form of "dark matter," which gravitationally attracts but is otherwise invisible and most of the remainder (75%) takes the form of "dark energy," which causes space to expand at an ever-increasing rate. This implies that only a small fraction of the universe is matter that we understand! In this presentation, Blandford explore the evidence for dark matter and dark energy, as well as the experiments being developed to investigate their fundamental nature.

Roger Blandford is a native of England and took his BA, MA and PhD degrees at Cambridge University. Following postdoctoral research at Cambridge, Princeton and Berkeley he took up a faculty position at Caltech in 1976 where he was appointed as the Richard Chace Tolman Professor of Theoretical Astrophysics in 1989. In 2003 He moved to Stanford University to become the first Director of the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology and the Luke Blossom Chair in the School of Humanities and Science. His research interests include black hole astrophysics, cosmology, gravitational lensing, cosmic ray physics and compact stars. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American PhysicalSociety and a Member of the National Academy of Sciences. He recently chaired a two year National Academy of Sciences Decadal Survey of Astronomy and Astrophysics.

More information at http://www.ftpi.umn.edu/misel/index.html