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Larkin received Bardeen Prize

                                                       

Professor A. I. Larkin, (University of Minnesota), was a co-recipient of the 2003 Bardeen Prize for "work on the Theory of Vortex Matter."

This prize is "awarded for theoretical works which have provided significant insights on the nature of Superconductivity and have led to verifiable predictions." The prize was awarded on May 27, 2003, at the 7th International Conference on Materials and Mechanisms of Superconductivity and High Temperature Superconductors in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Professor Larkin shared the prize with Professor David Nelson of Harvard University and Dr. Valerii Vinokur of Argonne National Laboratory.

The Bardeen Prize is given by the International Conference on Materials and Mechanisms of Superconductivity and High Temperature Superconductors and named for Nobel Laureate, John Bardeen, who was an assistant professor of physics at the University of Minnesota from 1938-41. He left to act as a civilian physicist at the Naval Ordinance Laboratory in Washington, D.C duirng World War II. After the war, Bardeen joined Bell labs where he his research focused on electrical conduction in semiconductors and metals, surface properties of semiconductors, theory of superconductivity, and diffusion of atoms in solids. John Bardeen won the Nobel Prize in 1956 with Walter Brattain and William Shockley for their research on semiconductors and their discovery of the transistor effect. He won the Nobel prize again in 1972 with Leon Cooper and John Schrieffer for their jointly developed theory of superconductivity, usually called the BCS-theory.