University of Minnesota
School of Physics & Astronomy

Biophysics Seminar

Thursday, October 20th 2016
11:15 am:
Biophysics Seminar in 120 PAN
Speaker: Prof. David Grunwald, University of Massachusetts Medical School
Subject: New imaging modalities and analysis approaches for life sciences

Historically, major advances in biology have rapidly followed major advances in microscopy, often driven by biologists' desires to visualize ever and ever smaller objects. Microscopy overcoming the diffraction limit and reaching single molecule sensitivity has revolutionized biochemical and biomedical research both in vitro and in vivo. Current day bioimaging techniques that allow for high xyz location precision do not allow for high time resolution and are extremely challenging in live cell applications; similarly, imaging modalities capable of high time resolution (milliseconds) are limited to monitoring a single xyz-plane. Thus, using current state of the art technology, it is impossible to track the complete 3D movement of intracellular macromolecules in real time.

Remarkably, high end imaging is not a standard tool in biomedical research like, for instance PCR or deep sequencing. A main cause for this might well be the degree of expert knowledge needed to analyze the images, which can present vexing issues in image analysis like limited signal, unspecific background, empirically set thresholds, image filtering and false-positive-detection limiting overall detection efficiency.
I present advances in real time simultaneous imaging for multiple parameters in the space and color domain and a new concept for quantitative analysis of original image data rather than of image derived meta-data.

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