University of Minnesota
School of Physics & Astronomy

Cosmology Lunchtime Seminar

Monday, April 29th 2019
12:15 pm:
Speaker: Patrick Kelly, Univeristy of Minnesota
Subject: Observing Young Supernovae Early and Often

Since they occur infrequently in specific galaxies, supernovae (SNe)have been difficult to observe within minutes or hours of explosion. The early light curves of SNe, however, contain uniquely constraining information about the size and structure of the stellar progenitor, the presence of a companion revealed through collision the SN ejecta,and, for core-collapse SNe, the arrival of the shockwave at the progenitor's surface. Likewise, spectroscopic observations of SNe within hours or days of explosion can reveal the composition of the progenitor's wind prior to the explosion, since the wind becomes ionized due to the emerging shock. I will discuss progress towards early and high-candence observations of SNe, including those acquired by the Kepler and Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) missions.

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