Physics and Astronomy Calendar

All future


Tuesday, February 19th 2019
1:25 pm:
Space Physics Seminar in Tate 301-20
Speaker: Cynthia Cattell and Chris Colpitts
Subject: Wave generation by relativistic electron beams in a plasma: Initial results fromLAPD run
There will be no seminar this week.

Wednesday, February 20th 2019
1:25 pm:
Speaker: Boris Spivak, University of Washington
Subject: Magneto-transport phenomena related to the chiral anomaly in Weyl and Dirac semimetals

I will present a theory of magnetotransport phenomena related to the chiral anomaly in Weyl semimetals. I will show that conductivity, thermal conductivity, thermoelectric and the sound absorption coefficients exhibit strong and anisotropic magnetic field dependences. I will also discuss properties of magneto-plasmons and magneto-polaritons, whose existence is entirely determined by the chiral anomaly.

Faculty Host: Boris Shklovskii
Speaker: Nadja Strobbe (FNAL)
Subject: Taking aim at New Physics

The Standard Model of Particle Physics has been immensely successful. However, many questions remain, such as the nature of dark matter, the origin of the matter-antimatter asymmetry, and the question of naturalness and the hierarchy problem. A variety of New Physics models have been proposed to address these questions. One class of such new physics models is supersymmetry (SUSY).

Many searches for SUSY have been performed with the LHC data, and so far, none has found any signs of physics beyond the Standard Model. A theme common to many of these searches is the reliance on the presence of substantial missing transverse momentum (MET) from undetected SUSY particles. It is therefore reasonable to wonder whether SUSY could take a form that instead produces low-MET final states, thereby evading detection in standard searches.

In this seminar I will first discuss the motivation and strategy behind some of the traditional SUSY searches, focusing in particular on searches for the top squark. Then, I will introduce SUSY models that lead to low-MET final states, including stealth SUSY and R-parity violating SUSY. I will describe a novel analysis that takes aim at the challenging final state with top quarks, many extra jets, and low MET. Finally, I will conclude with a look towards the future, including HL-LHC projections for SUSY searches.


Thursday, February 21st 2019
10:10 am:
Biophysics Seminar in 120 PAN
Speaker: Gordon Smith, Assistant Professor, Department of Neuroscience, UMN
Subject: Development of large-scale networks in visual cortex.

Sensory perception requires the coordinated activity of tens of thousands of neurons, working together in large-scale networks. As developmental events define and constrain the ultimate capabilities of these networks, it is therefore essential to understand the mechanisms underlying their formation. This talk will present recent work showing that in the developing visual cortex, correlations in spontaneous neural activity define large-scale functional networks with precise local and long-range organization that span millimeters of cortical area. These early networks predict future stimulus-evoked activity well before it can be visually driven, suggesting they form a substrate for building a mature large-scale functional architecture.

12:10 pm:
Speaker: Grantland Hall and Pat Kelly
3:30 pm:
Special Public Lecture in Best Buy Theater, Northrop, University of Minnesota
Speaker: Roger Launius, Chief Historian for NASA and Senior Curator of the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum (retired)
Subject: Why Go to the Moon? Apollo, the Space Race, and the Many Faces of Lunar Exploration
3:35 pm:
Physics and Astronomy Colloquium in Physics Tate B50
Speaker: Flavio Cavanna, Yale
Subject: Lifting the lid on DUNE, the new international mega-science project in the US

The experimental discoveries of the last half century have placed neutrinos in the spotlight to unlock the mysteries of the matter's abundance unbalance in the Universe and of the ultimate fate of the stars. The lack of direct observations of proton decays, on the other hand, keeps at bay the dream that the forces of nature were unified at the beginning of time.
The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) is the new leading-edge, international mega-science experiment for neutrino science and proton decay search.
DUNE will consist of two paired neutrino detectors placed in the world’s most intense neutrino beam. One massive detector will be installed deep underground at the SURF laboratory, in South Dakota — 1,300 kilometers away from FERMILAB, where the second detector will be positioned just downstream the neutrino source. Detecting the energetic beam neutrinos at the far site and comparing with those detected at the near site can give insight about our matter dominated universe. The underground location of the far detector, screened from the overwhelming cosmic ray flow, may allow to detect tiny signals from neutrinos originated by a core-collapse supernova in the Milky Way and thus possibly peer inside a newly-formed neutron star. And finally, the extra-large amount of mass of the detector may allow primordial symmetries to occasionally resurface inside a proton and spontaneously morphing a quark into a lepton, with the proton instantly falling apart into a detectable flash of radiation.
But not only large mass and far distance matter to pursue this ambitious discovery plan: unprecedented detection technologies and a worldwide effort to build the detector are required. DUNE will use the state-of-the-art Liquid Argon TPC technology to instrument deep underground 70.000 tons of Liquid Argon at 87K, with millimeter scale 3D precision.
A 1 kTon precursor of the far LAr-TPC detector has been constructed and recently activated at the CERN Neutrino Platform, and is now taking data. A first look of the spectacular events collected will be shown.

Faculty Host: Roger Rusack

Friday, February 22nd 2019
11:00 am:
Nuclear Physics Seminar in Tate 301-20
Speaker: Tom Welle, University of Minnesota
Subject: To be announced.
12:20 pm:
Speaker: Xiaojun Fu
Subject: Broken symmetry states in the N = 3 Landau level of GaAs quantum wells with alloy disorder
12:30 pm:
High Energy Theory Lunchtime Seminar in Tate 110 (note location change for this week)
Speaker: Radu Roiban (Penn State)
2:30 pm:
Speaker: Anna Williams, Macalester University
Speaker: Michael Gordin, History - Princeton University
Subject: Einstein in Bohemia: Science and Prague before and after the Habsburgs
Refreshments served at 3:15 p.m.
3:35 pm:
There will be no seminar this week.
Speaker:  Carolyn Bishoff, UMN Libraries

Monday, February 25th 2019
12:15 pm:
Speaker: TBD

Tuesday, February 26th 2019
1:25 pm:
Space Physics Seminar in Tate 301-20
Speaker: Y. Miyoshi (Nagoya University, Project Scientist of ERG/Arase mission) and Y. Kasahara (Kanazawa University)
Subject: 1. Overview of Arase and highlights from the prime mission. 2. Highlights from plasma wave observation by Arase

These are two talks on the Japanese radiation belt mission, ARASE.

Speaker: Derryl Wright
Subject: Machine Learning and Citizen Science at Zooniverse

As researchers gather ever larger data sets there is an increasing reliance on machine learning and demand for citizen science. We will introduce Zooniverse, the world's largest citizen science platform and show how citizen science is helping researchers unlock meaningful information from the data they collect. We will also demonstrate how, classifications produced by volunteers, are enabling machine learning and that both citizen science and machine learning can empower each other to process data more efficiently than either alone.

Faculty Host: Vuk Mandic

Wednesday, February 27th 2019
1:25 pm:
Speaker: Joerg Schmalian, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology
Subject: Hierarchy of Information Scrambling, Thermalization, and Hydrodynamic Flow in Graphene

We determine the information scrambling rate due to electron-electron Coulomb interaction in graphene. The scrambling rate characterizes the growth of chaos and has been argued to give information about the thermalization and hydrodynamic transport coefficients of a many-body system. We discuss the scrambling rate at strong coupling, using a direct diagrammatic analysis and holographic methods and show that scrambling behaves similar to transport and energy relaxation rates. A weak coupling analysis, however, reveals that scrambling is in fact related to dephasing and single particle relaxation. Thus, while scrambling is obviously necessary for thermalization and quantum transport, it does generically not set the time scale for these processes.

Faculty Host: Rafael Fernandes

Thursday, February 28th 2019
10:10 am:
Biophysics Seminar in 120 PAN
Speaker: Paul Jardine, Associate Professor, Department of Diagnostic and Biological Sciences, UMN
Subject: Using Model Systems to Drive Methods Development – The Tale of a Viral RNA

Model systems serve a critical role in the development of new research methodologies. By their nature, model systems are well defined and therefore present excellent opportunities to extend the resolution, range of application, and rigour of advanced biochemical and biophysical experimental techniques. Given that they are, by definition, some of the simplest living systems, viral model systems have been used to advance all areas of molecular biology and biophysics. Here, I will summarise the experimental history of one small component of a viral force generator nanomotor – the prohead RNA (pRNA) component of the bacteriophage phi29 DNA packaging machine – and illustrate how the study of this molecule has revealed fundamental insight into biological macromolecules. The study of pRNA has contributed to the development of experimental approaches that can be adapted to more complex systems in order to address more complex questions in biological systems.

12:10 pm:
Speaker: Roberta Humphreys and Avery Garon
3:35 pm:
Physics and Astronomy Colloquium in Physics Tate B50
Speaker: Joerg Schmalian, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology
Subject: Failed Theories of Superconductivity

Superconductivity is one of the most fascinating quantum states of matter. Almost half a century passed between the discovery of superconductivity by Kamerlingh Onnes and the theoretical explanation of the phenomenon by Bardeen, Cooper and Schrieffer (BCS). During the intervening years the brightest minds in theoretical physics tried and failed to develop a microscopic understanding of the effect. A summary of some of those unsuccessful attempts to understand superconductivity not only demonstrates the extraordinary achievement made by formulating the BCS theory, but also illustrates that mistakes are a natural and healthy part of scientific discourse, and that inapplicable, even incorrect theories can turn out to be interesting and inspiring.

Faculty Host: Rafael Fernandes

Friday, March 1st 2019
12:20 pm:
Speaker: TBA (several)
Subject: March Meeting rehearsals
12:30 pm:
Speaker: Ken Van Tilburg (IAS/New York U.)
Subject: TBA
2:30 pm:
Speaker:  Dale Gary, New Jersey Institute of Technology
Subject: A Breakthrough View of Solar Flares from Radio Imaging Spectroscopy

Solar flares are the result of explosive release of stored magnetic energy in the Sun's corona. The detailed physical processes that underlie the rapid conversion of such energy to other forms, particularly the acceleration of electrons and ions to relativistic energies, remain mysterious, partly because direct measurements of the coronal magnetic field and the spatial and energy distribution of the particles have been difficult or impossible. One emission mechanism that is sensitive to the coronal magnetic field in the flaring region is radio emission, but until recently the instrument capabilities needed to exploit that sensitivity have not been available. However, this has changed with the completion of a new, solar dedicated radio interferometer array, the Expanded Owens Valley Solar Array (EOVSA), that has the required combination of spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution to make these breakthrough measurements. In this talk, I illustrate the new capabilities and their implications using observations of a showcase solar flare that occurred on 2017 September 10. This event is a textbook example of the "standard solar flare model" eruptive event, with a clearly visible reconnecting current sheet connecting an erupting flux rope with a growing arcade of newly formed "post-flare" loops. The comparison of microwave diagnostics of high-energy electrons with those from hard X-rays seen by the RHESSI spacecraft show that, while they are fully consistent, the microwaves reveal that the coronal volume containing high-energy particles is much larger and more widespread than would have been deduced from hard X-rays alone. Even more important, however, are the quantitative measurements of the spatially and temporally resolved magnetic field strength, which, if our interpretation is correct, directly reveal the conversion of magnetic energy over a large volume into high-energy charged particles.and turbulent plasma. The new observations present both a challenge and an opportunity for further theoretical understanding of the processes occurring in solar flares.

Faculty Host: John Wygant
Speaker: Lee Penn, CHEM and Diversity Committee

Monday, March 4th 2019
12:15 pm:
Speaker: TBD

Tuesday, March 5th 2019
1:25 pm:
Space Physics Seminar in Tate 301-20
Speaker: Demoz Gebre Egziabher, Aerospace Engineering, UMN
Subject: TBD
Speaker: Georgios Giannakis
Subject: Online Scalable Learning Adaptive to Unknown Dynamics and Graphs

Kernel based methods exhibit well-documented performance in various nonlinear learning tasks. Most of them rely on a preselected kernel, whose prudent choice presumes task-specific prior information. Especially when the latter is not available, multi-kernel learning has gained popularity thanks to its flexibility in choosing kernels from a prescribed kernel dictionary. Leveraging the random feature approximation, this talk will introduce first for static setups a scalable multi-kernel learning approach (termed Raker) to obtain the sought nonlinear learning function ‘on the fly,’ bypassing the `curse of dimensionality’ associated with kernel methods. We will also present an adaptive multi-kernel learning scheme (termed AdaRaker) that relies on weighted combinations of advices from hierarchical ensembles of experts to boost performance in dynamic environments. The weights account not only for each kernel’s contribution to the learning process, but also for the unknown dynamics. Performance is analyzed in terms of both static and dynamic regrets. AdaRaker is uniquely capable of tracking nonlinear learning functions in environments with unknown dynamics, with analytic performance guarantees. The approach is further tailored for online graph-adaptive learning with scalability and privacy. Tests with synthetic and real datasets will showcase the effectiveness of the novel algorithms.

Faculty Host: Vuk Mandic

Wednesday, March 6th 2019
1:25 pm:
March APS Meeting - No speaker this week
Speaker: Jim Linnemann, Michigan State University
Subject: HAWC: Extreme Astronomy with Big Buckets of Water

Though we can see thousands of stars in a clear night sky, the number of known sources emitting TeV gamma rays is less than 200. This is both because there are few instruments capable of measuring such photons, and because the sources are restricted to particularly violent astrophysical processes which
produce photons of 100 TeV and beyond. The HAWC (High Energy Water Cherenkov) array is the only survey instrument in this energy range. Located on a plateau between two volcanos in Mexico at an altitude of 4100 m, HAWC is able to survey 60% of the sky, and observes 1/6 of the full sky at any moment, day or night. I will discuss the array, its construction and principles of operation, a selection of recent results spanning particle astrophysics to astronomy, and how we are pursuing multi-messenger astronomy to better understand the nature of TeV gamma ray sources.

Faculty Host: Roger Rusack

Thursday, March 7th 2019
08:00 am:
Untitled in Physics
No speaker this week.
08:00 am:
Physics and Astronomy Colloquium in Physics Tate B50
Speaker: Marc Pinsonneault, The Ohio State University
Faculty Host: Evan Skillman
10:10 am:
Biophysics Seminar in 120 PAN
No speaker this week.
12:10 pm:
Speaker: Sourabh Chauhan and Evan Tyler

Friday, March 8th 2019
12:30 pm:
Speaker: Jessica Turner (Fermilab)
2:30 pm:
Speaker: Marc Pinsonneault, The Ohio State University
Speaker: Lee Penn, CHEM and Diversity Committee

Monday, March 11th 2019
12:15 pm:
Speaker: TBD

Tuesday, March 12th 2019
1:25 pm:
Space Physics Seminar in Tate 301-20
Speaker: Aaron Breneman
Subject: TBD
Speaker: Vladimir Cherkassky
Subject: Deliberations on Scientific and Methodological Aspects of Machine Learning

Many diverse fields, such as applied mathematics, statistics, machine learning, data mining, econometrics, bioinformatics etc. are all concerned with estimation of data-analytic models. More recently, due to abundance of data and cheap computing power, machine learning (ML) algorithms have become very popular in various applications, even though many such algorithms are heuristics vaguely motivated by biological/ not mathematical/ arguments. This disconnect (between mathematics and practical applications) may seem strange, given the deep intrinsic connection between mathematics and natural sciences. Well-known historical examples include Kepler’s Laws and (classical) statistical science. The purpose of my talk is to explain various reasons for current disconnect, including (a) conceptual (philosophical) aspects; (b) technical (~mathematical) aspects and (c) non-technical (social) aspects. In particular, my talk will elaborate on different interpretation of philosophical concepts (of deductive and inductive reasoning), in classical statistics and in ML. This methodological difference will be further clarified via several basic assumptions underlying all ML methods – as presented in Vapnik-Chervonenkis (VC) learning theory. Further, I will discuss several ‘non-standard’ inductive problem settings (i.e., different from standard supervised learning) that often enable better generalization with finite training data.

Faculty Host: Vuk Mandic

Wednesday, March 13th 2019
1:25 pm:
Speaker: Oleg Starykh, University of Utah
Subject: TBD
Faculty Host: Andrey Chubukov

Thursday, March 14th 2019
10:10 am:
Biophysics Seminar in 120 PAN
Speaker: Alexander Grosberg, Department of Physics, NYU
Subject: TBD
Faculty Host: Vincent Noireaux
12:10 pm:
Speaker: Nathan Eggen and Larry Rudnick
3:35 pm:
Physics and Astronomy Colloquium in Physics Tate B50
Speaker: Alexander Grosberg, New York University
Subject: Statistical Mechanics of Active Particles

Active particles are the ones having a source of energy to drive them, in addition to the usual Brownian motion. It could be swimming bacteria, or artificial swimmers of various kinds. Statistical mechanics of such out-of-equilibrium systems presents many steep challenges and features many unexpected phenomena. While energy barriers is a staple in physics (Boltzmann limit), force barriers are important for active particles (Sisyphus limit), leading to rectification of random walks, repulsive depletion, etc. Activity can also cause separation of active particles from passive ones even when there is no energetic preference for segregation. The latter effect is particularly strong for polymers, promising interesting applications in the physics of cell nucleus.

Faculty Host: Boris Shklovskii

Friday, March 15th 2019
12:20 pm:
Speaker: Hanteng Wang
Subject: TBA
12:30 pm:
Speaker: TBA
Subject: TBA
2:30 pm:
Speaker: TBD
4:40 pm:
Speaker: Priscilla Cushman, MIFA

Monday, March 18th 2019
12:15 pm:
Spring Break - no seminar this week.

Wednesday, March 20th 2019
1:25 pm:
Spring Break - No speaker this week.

Thursday, March 21st 2019
10:10 am:
Biophysics Seminar in 120 PAN
Spring Break - No speaker this week.
12:10 pm:
There will be be no Journal Club this week due to spring break
3:35 pm:
Physics and Astronomy Colloquium in Physics Tate B50
There will be be no colloquium this week due to spring break

Friday, March 22nd 2019
12:30 pm:
Speaker: SPRING BREAK -- No seminar
2:30 pm:
There will be be no colloquium this week due to spring break
Speaker: Spring break, no seminar this week

Monday, March 25th 2019
12:15 pm:
Speaker: TBD

Tuesday, March 26th 2019
1:25 pm:
Space Physics Seminar in Tate 301-20
Speaker: Trevor Knuth
Speaker: Vipin Kumar
Subject: TBD
Faculty Host: Vuk Mandic

Wednesday, March 27th 2019
1:25 pm:
Speaker: Itamar Kimchi, University of Colorado - Boulder
Subject: TBD
Faculty Co-Host: Alex Kamenev
Faculty Host: Fiona Burnell

Thursday, March 28th 2019
10:10 am:
Biophysics Seminar in 120 PAN
Speaker: Jerome C. Mertz, College of Engineering, Boston University
Subject: TBD
Faculty Host: Jochen Mueller
12:10 pm:
Speaker: Jin-Ah Kim and Liliya Williams
3:35 pm:
Physics and Astronomy Colloquium in Physics Tate B50
Speaker: Jason Hogan, Stanford
Subject: TBD
Faculty Host: Roger Rusack

Friday, March 29th 2019
12:20 pm:
Speaker: Zhen Jiang
Subject: TBA
12:30 pm:
Speaker: Vitaly Vanchurin (U. Minnesota, Duluth)
Subject: TBA
2:30 pm:
Speaker: Vuk Mandic
Subject: TBD
Faculty Host: Evan Skillman
4:40 pm:
Speaker: Roger Rusack, High Energy

Monday, April 1st 2019
08:00 am:
TBA in Physics
12:15 pm:
Speaker: TBD

Tuesday, April 2nd 2019
1:25 pm:
Space Physics Seminar in Tate 301-20
Speaker: Sophie Musset
Subject: TBD
Speaker: Mingyi Hong
Subject: TBD

Wednesday, April 3rd 2019
Speaker: Graeme Luke, McMaster University
Subject: TBD
Faculty Host: Martin Greven
Speaker: Graeme Luke, McMaster University
Subject: To be announced
7:00 pm:
Speaker: Robert Kennicutt, University of Arizona and Texas A&M University
Subject: The Cosmic Ecosystem:  Connecting the Life Cycles of Stars, Galaxies, and the Universe

The past decade has seen a quiet revolution in our understanding of the "Origins" questions in astronomy, namely how galaxies, stars, planets, the chemical elements, and the universe itself were formed and evolve over the history of time.  Observations of galaxies with the Hubble Space Telescope and a variety of ground-based instruments have allowed us to reconstruct an empirical history of galaxies from the Big Bang to the present, and the introduction of sophisticated numerical models have transformed our theoretical understanding this evolution.
 
Remarkably, the same theory for the evolution and structure of our universe, in which dark matter and dark energy play the dominant roles, when extrapolated to smaller scales also reproduces most of the observed properties of galaxies over cosmic time.  In this picture the key physical processes take place over an enormous dynamic range of physical scales, from cosmological scales to those of individual massive stars and black holes, all closely linked and interacting in a what can be regarded as a self-regulating ecosystem.  This talk will describe how the observational, theoretical, and numerical pieces of this new picture came together, and will highlight some of the current questions, challenges, and exciting opportunities which lie ahead.

About the speaker: Robert Kennicutt is Professor of Astronomy at the University of Arizona and at Texas A&M University, and Executive Director of the Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy at TAMU. He is an Emeritus Professor at the University of Cambridge, where he held the Plumian Professorship in Astronomy and Experimental Philosophy, and also served as Director of the Institute of Astronomy and Head of the School of the Physical Sciences.

Kennicutt earned his PhD degree from the University of Washington, and his first faculty position was in the School of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Minnesota (1980-1988), before moving on to faculty positions in Arizona and Cambridge. He served as Editor-in-Chief of The Astrophysical Journal, and this year will become Co-Editor of the Annual Review of Astronomy and Astrophysics. Together with Fiona Harrison he is co-chairing the National Academy of Sciences Astro2020 Decadal Survey of Astronomy and Astrophysics. Kennicutt’s research focuses on observational extragalactic astronomy and cosmology, including the structure and evolution of galaxies, star formation in galaxies, chemical abundances in the universe, and the extragalactic distance scale. His studies span a wide range of wavelengths from radio to ultraviolet, and from nearby galaxies to distant galaxies observed when the universe was a fraction of its current age. He co-led (with Jeremy Mould and Wendy Freedman) the Hubble Space Telescope Key Project on the extragalactic distance scale, and three were awarded the Gruber Cosmology Prize for this work. Other awards include the AAS/AIP Dannie Heineman Prize in Astrophysics, the Gold Medal of the Royal Astronomical Society, and the NAS Award for Scientific Reviewing. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and is a Fellow of the Royal Society.


Thursday, April 4th 2019
10:10 am:
Biophysics Seminar in 120 PAN
Speaker: Sara Walker, School of Earth and Space Exploration, ASU
Faculty Host: J. Woods Halley
12:10 pm:
Speaker: Karl Young
3:35 pm:
Van Vleck Colloquium in Physics Tate B50
Speaker: Rob Kennicutt, Texas A&M University
Subject: The Schmidt Law at Sixty

Sixty years have passed since Maarten Schmidt's conjecture that star formation in galaxies was closely coupled to gas density, and since that time the Schmidt law has become an indispensable tool for interpreting, modeling, and simulating large-scale star formation in galaxies. Despite its success as a sub-grid "recipe" for the star formation rate, however, we remain far away from an ab initio theory of star formation, or even a clear understanding of the observed scaling laws themselves. This talk will review the current state of our observational understanding of star formation in galaxies, and the complexity which lies beneath the surface of the observed SFR scaling relations. We are witnessing an observational and theoretical renaissance in the subject, as multi-wavelength observations reveal the multi-scale nature of the star formation process and the complex interactions which are taking place between cosmological, gravitational, interstellar, and stellar feedback processes on these different scales. The picture which emerges is one in which the superficially simple star formation scaling laws are manifestations of a highly dynamic, complex, and self-regulating ecosystem in galactic disks.

Faculty Host: Ronald Poling

Friday, April 5th 2019
12:20 pm:
Speaker: Mengqun Li
Subject: TBA
12:30 pm:
Speaker: Raymond Co (U. Michigan)
Subject: TBA
2:00 pm:
Speaker: Rob Kennicutt, Texas A&M University
Subject: 2020 Decadal Survey
4:40 pm:
Speaker: Marvin Marshak, Particle physics

Monday, April 8th 2019
12:15 pm:
Speaker: Lindsey Bleem, Argonne National Laboratory
Subject: SPT Cluster Cosmology

Tuesday, April 9th 2019
Speaker: Dan Frisbie and Kevin Dorfman
Subject: TBD
Faculty Host: Vuk Mandic

Wednesday, April 10th 2019
1:25 pm:
Speaker: Vidya Madhavan, University of Illinois - Urbana-Champaign
Subject: TBD
Faculty Host: Martin Greven

Thursday, April 11th 2019
10:10 am:
Biophysics Seminar in 120 PAN
Speaker: Mark Sanders, Program Director, University of Minnesota Imaging Centers
Subject: TBD
12:10 pm:
Speaker: Sean Bruton and Hugh Dickinson
3:35 pm:
Physics and Astronomy Colloquium in Physics Tate B50
Speaker: Dimitar Sasselov, Harvard
Subject: TBD
Faculty Host: Evan Skillman

Friday, April 12th 2019
12:20 pm:
Speaker: Protyush Sahu
Subject: TBA
12:30 pm:
Speaker: Erich Poppitz (U. Toronto)
Subject: TBA
2:30 pm:
Speaker: Eliot Quataert, UC Berkeley
Subject: What Happens When a Massive Star Fails (Sort of) to Explode?

There are observational and theoretical reasons to suspect that up to
10s of percent of massive stars that undergo core-collapse at the end
of their lives fail to explode in a canonical energetic supernova
explosion. In this talk I will describe what transpires in such
nominally failed supernovae and its importance for understanding the
masses and spins of black holes (e.g., detected by LIGO). I will also
describe how 'failed' supernovae may manifest themselves
observationally in time-domain surveys.

Speaker: Nancy Sims, UMN Libraries
Subject: Copyright Triage

Monday, April 15th 2019
12:15 pm:
Speaker: Keith Bechtol, University of Wisconsin - Madison
Subject: DM w. DES/LSST

Tuesday, April 16th 2019
1:25 pm:
Space Physics Seminar in Tate 301-20
Speaker: Sheng Tian
Subject: TBD
Speaker: Andrew Zolli, Vice President, Global Impact Initiatives, Planet
Subject: Using Space to Help Life on Earth: How the Small Satellite Revolution and AI are Transforming How We See and Understand Our World

A revolution in low-cost, space-based remote sensing, combined with new analytical tools in machine learning, computer vision and artificial intelligence, are creating unprecedented new opportunities for tackling the world’s toughest challenges.

Andrew Zolli is the Vice President for Global Impact Initiatives at Planet (www.planet.com). Started by three NASA engineers, Planet has deployed the largest constellation of Earth-observation satellite in history. Together, these satellites image the entire surface of the Planet, every day, in high resolution. The resulting data holds transformational potential for basic science, and for a host of global challenges, including monitoring deforestation, agriculture and cities, tracking migration, mitigating the effects of climate change, speeding disaster response, and delivering planetary health, among others.

In this talk, Andrew will share lessons from the forefront of the New Space renaissance, as well as breakthrough new remote sensing applications being used right now around the world, and describe how new agile manufacturing and development technologies are accelerating the pace of innovation.

Faculty Host: Vuk Mandic

Wednesday, April 17th 2019
1:25 pm:
Speaker: Jorn Venderbos, University of Pennsylvania
Subject: TBD
Faculty Host: Rafael Fernandes

Thursday, April 18th 2019
10:10 am:
Biophysics Seminar in 120 PAN
Speaker: Erin Sheets, Associate Professor, University of Minnesota, Duluth, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry
Subject: TBD
Faculty Host: Elias Puchner
12:10 pm:
Speaker: Mike Makmur and Vihang Mehta
3:35 pm:
Physics and Astronomy Colloquium in Physics Tate B50
Speaker: Ian Tregillis, Los Alamos National Laboratory
Subject: TBD
Faculty Host: Thomas W. Jones

Friday, April 19th 2019
12:20 pm:
Speaker: Dan Phan
Subject: TBA
12:30 pm:
Speaker: Matt Reece (Harvard U.)
Subject: TBA
2:30 pm:
Speaker: Peter Garnovich, University of Notre Dame
Subject: TBD
Faculty Host: Patrick Kelly
4:40 pm:
Speaker: Paul Crowell, Condensed Matter

Monday, April 22nd 2019
12:15 pm:
Speaker: Patrick Kelly, University of Minnesota

Tuesday, April 23rd 2019
Speaker: Jarvis Haupt and Mike Garwood
Subject: TBD
Faculty Host: Vuk Mandic

Wednesday, April 24th 2019
1:25 pm:
Speaker: Ming Yi, Rice University
Subject: TBD
Faculty Host: Rafael Fernandes

Thursday, April 25th 2019
10:10 am:
Biophysics Seminar in 120 PAN
Speaker: Angel Mancebo, School of Physics and Astronomy, UMN (Elias Puchner Lab)
Subject: TBD
12:10 pm:
Speaker: Trevor Knuth and Evan Skillman
3:35 pm:
Physics and Astronomy Colloquium in Physics Tate B50
Speaker: Sanjay Reddy, University of Washington
Subject: TBD
Faculty Host: Joseph Kapusta

Friday, April 26th 2019
12:20 pm:
Speaker: Fei Chen
Subject: TBA
12:30 pm:
Speaker: Grant Remmen (UC Berkeley)
Subject: TBA
2:30 pm:
Speaker: TBD
Faculty Host: Charles E. Woodward
Speaker: Career Advisory Board Visit + Meet, no seminar this week.

Monday, April 29th 2019
12:15 pm:
Speaker: TBD

Tuesday, April 30th 2019
Speaker: TBD
Subject: TBD
Faculty Host: Vuk Mandic

Wednesday, May 1st 2019
1:25 pm:
Speaker: Jack Harris, Yale University
Subject: TBD
Faculty Host: Paul Crowell

Thursday, May 2nd 2019
10:10 am:
Biophysics Seminar in 120 PAN
Speaker: TBD
12:10 pm:
Speaker: Tom Jones and Jamie Cheshire
3:35 pm:
Speaker: Jack Harris (Yale University)
Subject: TBD
Refreshments in atrium after the Colloquium.
Faculty Host: Paul Crowell

Friday, May 3rd 2019
12:20 pm:
Speaker: Saumitran Kastirurangan
Subject: TBA
12:30 pm:
Speaker: Sergei Dubovksy (NYU)
2:30 pm:
There will be no colloquium this week

Tuesday, May 7th 2019
Speaker: Stefano Gonella and Bojan Guzina
Subject: TBD
Faculty Host: Vuk Mandic

Wednesday, May 8th 2019
Speaker: Turab Lookman
Faculty Host: Martin Greven

Thursday, May 9th 2019
3:35 pm:
Physics and Astronomy Colloquium in Physics Tate B50
Speaker: David Weinberg, The Ohio State University
Subject: TBD
Faculty Host: Clement Pryke

Friday, May 10th 2019
12:20 pm:
Speaker: Robert Sponsel
Subject: TBA

Wednesday, September 25th 2019
1:25 pm:
Speaker: Scott Crooker, Los Alamos National Lab
Subject: TBD
Faculty Host: Paul Crowell

Wednesday, October 16th 2019
7:00 pm:
14th Annual Misel Family Lecture in McNamara Alumni Center 
Speaker: Professor Charles M. Marcus, Niels Bohr Institute

Thursday, October 17th 2019
3:35 pm:
14th Annual Misel Colloquium in Tate Hall B50
Speaker: Professor Charles M. Marcus, Niels Bohr Institute

Wednesday, November 13th 2019
1:25 pm:
Speaker: Ana Maria Rey, University of Colorado - Boulder
Subject: TBD

Wednesday, January 1st 2020

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