Nuclear Physics Seminar

semester, 2018


Friday, January 19th 2018
10:10 am:
Nuclear Physics Seminar in Tate 201-20
To be announced.

Tuesday, January 23rd 2018
2:30 pm:
Speaker: Chun Shen, Brookhaven National Laboratory
Subject: Going with the flow— the nuclear phase diagram at the highest temperatures and densities

Nuclear matter has a complex phase structure, with a deconfined Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) expected to be present under conditions of extreme pressure and temperature. The hot QGP filled the universe about few microseconds after the Big Bang. This hot nuclear matter can be generated in the laboratory via the collision of heavy atomic nuclei at high energy. I will review recent theoretical progress in studying the transport properties the QGP at almost zero baryon density. The recent beam energy scan experiments at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) offer a unique opportunity to study the nuclear phase diagram in a hot and baryon-rich environment. I will focus on the development of a comprehensive framework that is able to connect the fundamental theory of strong interactions with the RHIC experimental observations. This dynamical framework paves the way for quantitative characterization of the QGP and for locating the critical point in the nuclear phase diagram. These studies will advance our understanding of strongly interacting many-body systems and build interconnections with other areas of physics, including string theory, cosmology, and cold atomic gases.


Friday, January 26th 2018
10:10 am:
Nuclear Physics Seminar in Tate 201-20
There will be a special nuclear physics seminar on Tuesday this week.

Friday, February 2nd 2018
10:10 am:
Nuclear Physics Seminar in Tate 201-20
There will be no seminar this week.

Tuesday, February 6th 2018
2:30 pm:
Speaker: David Radice, Princeton University
Subject:  Multimessenger astrophysics with numerical relativity
Candidate for the Nucear Theory Assistant Professor position

How are neutron stars formed and what is inside them? What is the
engine powering short gamma-ray bursts? What is the astrophysical site
of production of heavy elements? Multimessenger observations of
compact binary coalescence and core-collapse supernovae might provide
us with the key to answer these and other important open questions in
theoretical astrophysics. However, multimessenger astronomy also poses
new challenges to the theorists who need to develop models for the
joint interpretation of all data channels. In this talk, I will
present recent theoretical results. I will review the landmark
multimessenger observation of merging neutron stars, and I will
discuss its interpretation and implication in the light of results
from first-principles simulations. Finally, I will discuss future
challenges and prospective for this nascent field.


Friday, February 9th 2018
10:10 am:
Nuclear Physics Seminar in Tate 201-20
There will be a special nuclear physics seminar on Tuesday this week.

Friday, February 16th 2018
10:10 am:
Nuclear Physics Seminar in Tate 201-20
There will be no seminar this week.

Tuesday, February 20th 2018
2:30 pm:
Speaker:  Jorge Noronha, Universidade de Sao Paulo
Subject: Unveiling the secrets of nature's primordial liquid
Candidate for the Nucear Theory Assistant Professor position

Microseconds after the Big Bang, the Universe cooled into an exotic phase of matter. There the fundamental building blocks of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), known as quarks and gluons, were not confined inside the core of atomic nuclei. Tiny specks of this early Universe matter, called the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP), are now being copiously produced in heavy ion collisions at both RHIC and the LHC. These experiments provide overwhelming evidence that the QGP flows like a nearly frictionless strongly coupled liquid over distance scales not much larger than the size of a proton. Thus, the QGP formed in particle colliders is the hottest, smallest, densest, most perfect liquid known to humanity. Yet, the theoretical underpinnings behind the liquid-like behavior of QCD matter remain elusive.

In this talk I will present first principles calculations performed within string theory and relativistic kinetic theory that have shed new light on the emergence of hydrodynamic behavior in QCD and challenged the very foundations of fluid dynamics. New techniques to determine the real time, far-from-equilibrium dynamics of QCD in the large baryon density regime will also be discussed to lead current experimental efforts to discover critical phenomena in the fundamental theory of strong interactions.


Friday, February 23rd 2018
10:10 am:
Nuclear Physics Seminar in Tate 201-20
There will be no seminar this week.

Tuesday, March 6th 2018
2:30 pm:
Speaker: Jennifer Barnes, Columbia University
Subject: TBD
Candidate for the Nucear Theory Assistant Professor position

Tuesday, March 27th 2018
2:30 pm:
Speaker: Vladimir Skokov, Brookhaven National Laboratory
Subject: TBD
Candidate for the Nucear Theory Assistant Professor position

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