Physics and Astronomy Calendar

All future


Thursday, October 18th 2018
Speaker: Evan Tyler, University of Minnesota
3:35 pm:
Biophysics Seminar in B50 Tate 
Speaker: Terry Hwa, Department of Physics, University of California at San Diego Physics and Astronomy Colloquium
(Note: Terry Hwa will not give a Biophysics Seminar but just a colloquium)
3:35 pm:
Speaker: Terry Hwa, University of California, San Diego
Subject: Bacterial growth laws and the origin of dimensional reduction
Refreshments in atrium after the Colloquium.

A cell is the smallest unit of a freely living system. Our understanding of cells is measured by our ability to predict cellular behaviors in response to environmental changes and genetic manipulations. Traditionally, researchers strive to gain insights into cellular behaviors through characterizing the underlying molecular interactions. This ‘bottom-up’ approach however requires a macroscopic number of largely inaccessible parameters in order to be predictive. I will describe a complementary ‘top-down’ approach based on quantitative phenomenology. Extensive quantitative experiments establish that the model bacterium E. coli organizes many of its behavioral responses in very simple manners in accordance to the rate of cell growth. The existence of these simple empirical relations (growth laws) despite myriads of complex molecular interactions is a striking manifestations of a tremendous degree of dimensional reduction occurring in living cells. I will describe how the growth laws can be used to make accurate predictions of cell behaviors without fitting parameters. I will also discuss how the magical dimension reduction can be accomplished by cells through clever strategy of gene regulation.

Faculty Host: Elias Puchner

Friday, October 19th 2018
12:20 pm:
Speaker: Zach Anderson
Subject: Neutron scattering study of antiferromagnetic excitations in HgBa2CuO4+δ
Speaker: Emilian Dudas (Ecole Polytechnique)
Subject: Hidden symmetries and Goldstone bosons from higher dimensions?

Free massless scalars have a shift symmetry. This is usually broken by interactions, such that quantum corrections induce a quadratically divergent mass term. In the Standard Model this leads to the hierarchy problem, the question why the Higgs mass is so much smaller than the Planck mass. We present an example where a large scalar mass term is avoided by coupling the scalar to an infinite tower of massive states, obtained from a six-dimensional theory compactified on a torus with magnetic flux. We show that the shift symmetry of the scalar is preserved in the effective four-dimensional theory despite the presence of gauge and Yukawa interaction terms.

Speaker: Adam Frank, University of Rochester
Subject: Blowing Away Exoplanets: The Photo-evaporation of Planetary Atmospheres

Mass loss from exoplanets driven by stellar photo-ionizing fluxes may be a fundamental process setting the final state of planetary atmospheres and, therefore, habitability. In this talk I present new results from 3-D AMR multi-physics simulations exploring the processes and consequences of atmospheric photo-evporation including its observation signatures.

Speaker: Jaipreet Virdi, University of Delaware
Subject: Mechanical Quackery: Electrical Cures for Deafness in the United States, 1880-1930
Refreshments served at 3:15 p.m.

During the late nineteenth century, electrical entrepreneurs began to glut the direct-to-consumer medical market with a plethora of electrotherapy machines for curing deafness. They claimed their machines fostered a world of unbridled optimism for restoring bodies to health; in a few sessions, these machines could harness the power of electricity to jolt dead ears or apply a vibratory force to “break up” deposits in the ear. Although ear specialists—known as “aurists”—denounced such “cure all” treatments for deafness, electrical entrepreneurs made no demarcation between congenital and non-congenital cases of hearing loss, thus appealing to patient-consumers frustrated with traditional therapeutics. Electrotherapy devices also offered an effective but gentle remedy to those distrustful or skeptical of compressed powdered pills, nefarious nostrums, or other patented goods available for purchase. By the 1930s, a growing public awareness of medical fraud, combined with stricter federal regulation, led to the steady decline of electrotherapeutics usage in the home; while most mechanical deafness cures were dismissed by the American Medical Association and the Food & Drug Association as quackery in its finest forms, these devices highlight the fluid boundaries that existed between healthcare practices, and the many ways consumers attempted to regain control over their health. More broadly, these devices convey a broader historical context for understanding how and why deaf consumers attempted to cure or normalize their hearing loss.

4:40 pm:
Speaker: Ke Wang, Condensed Matter
Subject: Novel Quantum Physics in van der Waals Nanostructures

Monday, October 22nd 2018
12:15 pm:
Speaker: Wenlei Chen, UMN
Subject: Novel search for TeV-initiated pair cascades in the intergalactic medium

The observed magnetic fields in galaxies and galaxy clusters are believed to result from dynamo amplification of weak magnetic field seeds whose origin remains a long-standing open question. Beams of TeV gamma-rays from blazar jets can be used to infer the intensity, coherence length, and helicity of the intergalactic magnetic field. Intergalactic magnetic fields deflect the electron-positron pairs produced by TeV gamma-rays from blazars, resulting in broadened beams of secondary GeV gamma-rays known as pair halos. Such pair-cascades develop along the projected direction of the blazar jet, which is known from imaging radio observations. We searched for GeV pair halos in Fermi-LAT data around 12 high-synchrotron-peaked BL Lacs with well-determined jet orientation from VLBA radio observations. Our study exploits the expected asymmetry of blazar pair halos and uses advanced simulations of the pair cascades to improve the sensitivity of previous studies and increase the signal to noise. Although we find no significant detection, a 2-sigma hint for an extended pair halo along the direction of the jet appears in the stacked LAT data in the 30-300 GeV energy range, corresponding to an intergalactic magnetic field with strength of about 1E-15 Gauss. This magnetic field value is consistent with similar hints from independent studies using LAT data. We will present the results of our analysis and discuss the limitations of pair-halo searches due to astrophysical uncertainties. Finally, assuming that the apparent convergence on B ~ 1E-15 G is not coincidental, we will outline a clear path towards a positive detection of blazar pair halos with future space-borne and ground-based gamma-ray observatories.

Faculty Host: Patrick Kelly

Wednesday, October 24th 2018
1:25 pm:
Speaker: Johnpierre Paglione, University of Maryland, College Park
Subject:  High-spin superconductivity in topological half-Heusler semimetals

In all known fermionic superfluids, Cooper pairs are composed of spin-1/2 quasi-particles that pair to form either spin-singlet or spin-triplet bound states. The "spin" of a Bloch electron, however, is fixed by the symmetries of the crystal and the atomic orbitals from which it is derived, and in some cases can behave as if it were a spin-3/2 particle. The superconducting state of such a system allows pairing states to form beyond triplet, with higher spin quasi-particles combining to form quintet or even septet pairs. After reviewing experimental evidence for high-spin pairing in the exotic superconducting state of the half-Heusler compound YPtBi, I will introduce our recent work elucidating the influence of spin-orbit coupling on both the normal and superconducting states of this system

Faculty Host: Vlad Pribiag
4:40 pm:
CM Journal Club in Tate 201
Subject: Boltzmann Transport Equation

Thursday, October 25th 2018
10:10 am:
Biophysics Seminar in 120 PAN
Speaker: Oleg Krichevsky, Molecular Biophysics Lab, Ben-Gurion University
Subject:  T cell communication through cytokines follows a simple sink-diffusion model

Immune cells communicate by exchanging cytokines to achieve a context-appropriate response, but the distances over which such communication happens are not known. We used theoretical considerations and experimental models of immune responses in vitro and in vivo to quantify the spatial extent of cytokine communications in dense tissues. Using T cell exchange of IL-2 as a model system, we established that competition between cytokine diffusion and consumption generated spatial niches of high cytokine concentrations with sharp boundaries. The size of these self-assembled niches scaled with the density of cytokine-consuming cells, a parameter that gets tuned during immune responses. In vivo, we measured interactions on length scales of 80–120 um, which resulted in a high degree of cell-to-cell variance in cytokine exposure. Despite the complexity of the immune organs, the profiles of cytokine fields both in vitro and in vivo quantitatively follow the predictions of a simple model, essentially without any free parameters.

Ref. Oyler-Yaniv A, Oyler-Yaniv J, Whitlock B.M, Liu Z, Germain R.N, Huse M, Altan-Bonnet G. and O. Krichevsky (2017) , Immunity, 46, 609-620.

Faculty Host: Elias Puchner
Speaker: Nathan Eggen and Aliza Beverage, University of Minnesota
3:35 pm:
Speaker: Steven Gubser, Princeton
Subject: Number theory and spacetime
Refreshments in atrium after the Colloquium.

Our description of spacetime relies on the real numbers and hence is wedded to arbitrarily small intervals of length and time. But quantum theory hints at the existence of a smallest possible length, the Planck length. Number theory provides an alternative to the real numbers known as the p-adic numbers. Recent work has argued that quantum field theory defined over the p-adic numbers is holographically dual to a discrete spacetime. Constructions related to p-adic numbers also have a surprisingly prominent role in the early development of the renormalization group. I will explain what the p-adic numbers are and provide some intuition for what they are good for in string theory and beyond. The ultimate aim of using them to understand quantum gravity is ambitious indeed, but I will explain some first steps that give hope for the future.

Bio: Steve Gubser got his PhD from Princeton University in 1998, working with Igor Klebanov on what became the gauge-string duality. He did a post-doc at Harvard, then joined the faculty at Princeton. After a year at Caltech, he returned to Princeton and has been there ever since. He is now the Associate Chair for Undergraduates in Physics, and he is a recent recipient of a Simons Young Investigator award.

Faculty Host: Priscilla Cushman

Friday, October 26th 2018
12:20 pm:
Speaker: Yiming Wu
Subject: Special role of the first Matsubara frequency for superconductivity near a quantum-critical point --the non-linear gap equation below $T_c$ and spectral properties along the real frequency axis.
Speaker: Steven Gubser (Princeton)
Subject: From p-adic AdS/CFT to prospects in cold atoms

p-adic AdS/CFT is a version of the gauge-gravity duality where the boundary theory is defined over the p-adic numbers and the bulk is a discrete graph. A variant of p-adic field theories has emerged from recently proposed cold atom experiments based on sparse couplings. I will explain how a simplified version of these theories interpolates between an ordinary continuum field theory and p-adic field theory as a spectral exponent is dialed.

2:30 pm:
TBD in Tate 301-20
Speaker: Bin Chen, New Jersey Institute of Technology
4:40 pm:
Speaker: Michael Zudov, Condensed Matter

Monday, October 29th 2018
12:15 pm:
Speaker: Clem Pryke, UMN
Subject: New BICEP/Keck Results
Faculty Host: Vuk Mandic

Wednesday, October 31st 2018
1:25 pm:
Speaker: Adam Wei Tsen, University of Waterloo, Institute for Quantum Computing
Subject:  New Phase Transitions in Atomically Thin Quantum Materials

We have recently demonstrated an experimental platform to isolate 2D quantum materials that are unstable in the ambient environment. I will discuss our studies of the Weyl semimetal candidate, 1T’-MoTe2, and layered magnetic insulator, CrI3, in the atomically thin limit, made possible using this technique. In MoTe2, lowering dimensionality suppresses the inversion symmetric monoclinic phase, driving the Weyl ground state up to and beyond room temperature. The different electronic structure of thin samples is studied by magnetotransport measurements at low temperature. In CrI3, we observe a very large negative magnetoresistance effect that is quantitatively comparable to colossal magnetoresistance in the manganites. I will explain the origin of this effect and discuss some new opportunities for other 2D magnets.

Faculty Host: Ke Wang

Thursday, November 1st 2018
10:10 am:
Biophysics Seminar in 120 PAN
Speaker: Douglas G. Mashek, Professor, Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Biophysics and Department of Medicine, Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, University of Minnesota
Subject: The fascinating world of lipid droplet biology

Lipid droplets are recognized to be the primary storage form of energy in most cell types. While this important function is critical to supply cells or organisms with energy during times of nutrient deprivation, their role beyond energy storage has largely been unexplored. Our laboratory has focused on elucidating the mechanisms through which lipid droplets communicate within cells to coordinate energy storage with cell signaling and metabolism. Our work on hepatic lipid droplets has identified important functions for these dynamic organelles in regulating lipid and glucose metabolism, hormone signaling and cell proliferation. Specifically, data will be presented showing that lipid droplet catabolism promotes signaling networks to control mitochondrial biogenesis and function. Moreover, recent insights into the mechanisms through which lipid droplets are catabolized via autophagic pathways will also be discussed. In summary, this presentation will highlight novel roles for lipid droplets and their metabolism in cellular and organismal biology and their importance in human health.

Speaker: Chris Nolting, University of Minnesota
3:35 pm:
Speaker: Robert Kleinberg, Columbia University & Boston University
Subject: mK to km: How Millikelvin Physics is Reused to Explore the Earth Kilometers Below the Surface
Refreshments in atrium after the Colloquium.

Investigations of the superfluid phases of liquid helium-3 would seem to have little application to the study of rock formations thousands of meters below the surface of the earth. However, the physicist’s tool box is versatile, and techniques used in one field of study can be reused, with appropriate adaptation, in very different circumstances.

The temperature of liquid helium-3 in the millikelvin range can be measured using an unbalanced-secondary mutual inductance coil set designed to monitor the magnetic susceptibility of a paramagnetic salt. The loss signal is discarded by phase sensitive detection. Now consider the task of measuring the electrical conductivity, at centimeter scale, of the earth surrounding a borehole. Turn the mutual inductance coil set inside out, with secondary coils arranged to be unbalanced with respect to the rock wall. Instead of discarding the loss signal, use it to measure conductivity. A sensor based on this principle has been implemented in a widely deployed borehole geophysical instrument, used to estimate the prevailing direction of the wind millions of years ago, or to decide where to drill the next well in an oilfield.

Nuclear magnetic resonance may seem a very improbable measurement of the rock surrounding a borehole. Conventionally, we place the sample (which might be a human being) inside the NMR apparatus. In borehole deployment, the instrument is placed inside sample, the temperature is as high as 175C, pressure ranges to 140 MPa, and measurements must be made while moving at 10 cm/s. Apparatus with these specifications have been deployed worldwide, and are used to measure a number of rock properties, including the distribution of the sizes of pores in sedimentary rock, and the viscosity of oil found therein. They have also been used for geological and oceanographic studies in northern Alaska, and at the seafloor offshore Monterey, California.

Faculty Host: Shaul Hanany

Friday, November 2nd 2018
12:20 pm:
Speaker: Xuzhe Ying
Subject: TBA
Speaker: Anson Hook (U. Maryland)
Subject: TBA
4:40 pm:
Speaker: Robert Lysak, MIFA

Monday, November 5th 2018
12:15 pm:
Speaker: Guillermo Fernandez Moroni, Fermilab
Subject: TBD (CCD Detectors)
Faculty Host: Vuk Mandic

Wednesday, November 7th 2018
1:25 pm:
Speaker: Jason Petta, Princeton University
Subject: Microwave Spectroscopy of Valley States in Silicon

The bulk conduction band of Si has six equivalent valleys. Strain in Si/SiGe heterostructures
partially lifts the six-fold valley degeneracy by raising the energy of the four in-plane valleys. It is known that large electric fields can lift the degeneracy of the remaining two low-lying valleys. However, the measured valley splittings range from 10 – 300 eV, suggesting that microscopic details such as interface roughness and disorder impact the valley splitting. In this lecture I will describe how microwave spectroscopy can be applied to probe valley states in silicon nanostructures [1]. In the first experiment, a cavity coupled Si double quantum dot is probed using microwave frequency photons. The transmission of the photons through the microwave cavity displays signatures that are consistent with the valley degree of freedom and the data can be modeled using cavity input-output theory [2]. We also use Landau-Zener interferometry to probe the low-lying energy level structure of a silicon double quantum dot. The observed Landau-Zener interference pattern persists down to low driving frequencies of 50 MHz, suggesting relatively long-lived charge coherence. Low-lying valley states result in a unique Landau-Zener interference pattern that is in contrast with measurements on conventional two-level charge qubits [3]. These new probes of valley states have high energy resolution and may be applied to other low energy degrees of freedom.

1. Burkard and Petta, PRB 94, 195305 (2016).
2. Mi, Peterfalvi, Burkard, and Petta, PRL 119, 176803 (2017).
3. Mi, Kohler, and Petta, PRB 98, 161404(R) (2018).

Faculty Host: Ke Wang

Thursday, November 8th 2018
10:10 am:
Biophysics Seminar in 120 PAN
Speaker: Isaac Angert, graduate student in Jochen Mueller’s lab, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota
3:35 pm:
Speaker: Jason Petta, Princeton University
Subject: Quantum Computing with Electron Spins in Silicon
Refreshments in atrium after the Colloquium.

Electron spins are excellent candidates for solid state quantum computing due to their exceptionally long quantum coherence times, which is a result of weak coupling to environmental degrees of freedom. However, this isolation comes with a cost, as it is difficult to coherently couple two spins in the solid state, especially when they are separated by a large distance. Here we combine a large electric-dipole interaction with spin-orbit coupling to achieve spin-photon coupling [1]. Vacuum Rabi splitting is observed in the cavity transmission as the Zeeman splitting of a single spin is tuned into resonance with the cavity photon. We achieve a spin-photon coupling rate as large as gs/2 = 10 MHz, which exceeds both the cavity decay rate /2 = 1.8 MHz and spin dephasing rate /2= 2.4 MHz, firmly anchoring our system in the strong-coupling regime [2]. Moreover, the spin-photon coupling mechanism can be turned off by localizing the spin in one side of the double quantum dot. These developments in quantum dot cQED, combined with recent demonstrations of high-fidelity two-qubit gates in Si, firmly anchor Si as a leading material system in the worldwide race to develop a scalable quantum computer [3].

1. Mi et al., Science 355, 156 (2017).
2. Mi et al., Nature 555, 599 (2018).
3. Zajac et al., Science 359, 439 (2018).


Friday, November 9th 2018
12:20 pm:
Speaker: Yilikal Akino
Subject: TBA
Speaker: Keisuke Harigaya (IAS, Princeton)
Subject: TBA
4:40 pm:
Speaker: Randall Victoria, ECE

Monday, November 12th 2018
12:15 pm:
Speaker: TBD
Subject: TBD
Faculty Host: Vuk Mandic

Wednesday, November 14th 2018
1:25 pm:
Speaker: Mathias Scheurer, Harvard University
Faculty Host: Rafael Fernandes

Thursday, November 15th 2018
10:10 am:
Biophysics Seminar in PAN 120
Speaker: John Marko, Northwestern University
Subject: Single-molecule studies of protein-DNA interactions

All processing of DNA - transcription, replication, recombination and
repair - depend on the interactions of proteins with DNA. I will discuss
single-molecule methods for analyzing protein-DNA interactions, starting
with the (statistical)-mechanical response of DNA molecules and how
monitoring that can allow novel quantitative studies of proteins that fold
and change topology of DNA molecules. I will then describe a phenomenon
that appears pervasive for biomolecule interactions - "facilitated
dissociation" - that makes rates of turnover of molecular complexes in vivo
very different from what we observe in vitro.

Speaker: Jett Priewe, University of Minnesota
3:35 pm:
Speaker: John Marko, Northwestern University
Subject: Physics of chromosome folding and disentanglement
Refreshments in atrium after the Colloquium.

All biological phenomena depend on genetic information which is encoded
into the base-pair sequence along the very long DNA molecules found in all
living cells. The DNAs in chromosomes, in addition to being biologically
important, are amazing physical objects, being 2 nanometers wide and (in
humans) several centimeters in length. I will explain how the cell takes
care of these long, fragile chromosomal DNAs and how it uses DNA itself as
a key mechanical component of the cell nucleus. Then, during and
following DNA replication, our cells face the gigantic challenge of
figuring out how to topologically separate those long polymers from one
another. I will discuss our current understanding of the "lengthwise
compaction" mechanisms underlying this process, focusing on the interplay
between "loop-extruding" SMC complexes (mainly condensin) and
DNA-topology-changing topoisomerase II.

Faculty Host: Elias Puchner

Friday, November 16th 2018
12:20 pm:
Speaker: Ezra Day-Roberts
Subject: TBA
Speaker: Alba Grassi (SCGP Stony Brook)
4:40 pm:
Speaker: Roger Rusack, University of Minnesota
Subject: Elementary Particles

Monday, November 19th 2018
12:15 pm:
Speaker: Soumyajit Mandal, Case Western Reserve University
Subject: Ultra-steep-spectrum Sources in Galaxy Clusters
Faculty Host: Thomas W. Jones

Thursday, November 22nd 2018
No journal club, Thanksgiving Holiday

Friday, November 23rd 2018
Subject: NO SEMINAR - THANKSGIVING
4:40 pm:
Thanksgiving - there will not be a speaker this week.

Monday, November 26th 2018
12:15 pm:
Speaker: Sharan Banagiri, UMN
Subject: TBD (long duration transient searches with LIGO/Virgo)
Faculty Host: Vuk Mandic

Wednesday, November 28th 2018
1:25 pm:
Speaker: Kimberley Hill, CEGE
Faculty Host: James Kakalios

Thursday, November 29th 2018
10:10 am:
Biophysics Seminar in 120 PAN
Speaker: Santosh Adhikari, graduate student in Elias Puchner's lab, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota
Speaker: Huaqing Mao, University of Minnesota
3:35 pm:
Speaker: Marco Velli, UCLA
Refreshments in atrium after the Colloquium.
Faculty Host: Robert Lysak

Friday, November 30th 2018
12:20 pm:
Speaker: Sajna Hameed
Subject: TBA
Speaker: Jaroslav Trnka (UC Davis)
4:40 pm:
Speaker:  Cynthia Cattell, MIFA

Monday, December 3rd 2018
12:15 pm:
Speaker: Karl Young, UMN
Subject: TBD
Faculty Host: Shaul Hanany

Wednesday, December 5th 2018
1:25 pm:
Speaker: Damjan Pelc
Faculty Host: Martin Greven

Thursday, December 6th 2018
10:10 am:
Biophysics Seminar in 120 PAN
Speaker: Steven Vogel, NIH/NIAAA
Speaker: Sourabh Singh Chauhan, University of Minnesota
3:35 pm:
Speaker: Stacy McGaugh, Case Western
Refreshments in atrium after the Colloquium.
Faculty Host: J. Woods Halley

Friday, December 7th 2018
12:20 pm:
Speaker: Nicholas Lewellyn
Subject: TBA
Speaker: K. S. Babu (Oklahoma State U.)
Subject: TBA
4:40 pm:
Speaker: Paul Crowell, Condensed Matter

Monday, December 10th 2018
12:15 pm:
Speaker: Rich Ormiston, UMN
Subject: TBD (Machine Learning and LIGO)
Faculty Host: Vuk Mandic

Wednesday, December 12th 2018
1:25 pm:
Speaker: Brian Skinner, MIT
Faculty Host: Boris Shklovskii

Friday, December 14th 2018
12:20 pm:
Speaker: Daniel Shaffer
Subject: TBA

Friday, January 18th 2019
4:40 pm:
Speaker: Marvin Marshak, Particle physics

Friday, January 25th 2019
12:30 pm:
4:40 pm:
Speaker: Jochen Mueller, Biophysics

Wednesday, January 30th 2019
1:30 pm:
Speaker: Turab Lookman, Los Alamos National Lab
Faculty Host: Martin Greven

Thursday, January 31st 2019
3:35 pm:
Speaker: Roger Steuwer, U of Minnesota
Subject: From tFrom the Old to the New World of Nuclear Physics, 1919-1939he Old to the New World of Nuclear Physics, 1919-1939
Refreshments in atrium after the Colloquium.
Faculty Host: Michel Janssen

Friday, February 1st 2019
12:30 pm:
4:40 pm:
Speaker: Vincent Noireaux, Biophysics

Friday, February 8th 2019
12:30 pm:
4:40 pm:
Speaker: Shaul Hanany, Cosmology

Friday, February 15th 2019
12:30 pm:
4:40 pm:
Speaker: TBD

Friday, February 22nd 2019
12:30 pm:

Wednesday, February 27th 2019
1:30 pm:
Speaker: Joerg Schmalian, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology
Faculty Host: Rafael Fernandes

Friday, March 1st 2019
12:30 pm:

Friday, March 8th 2019
12:30 pm:

Friday, March 15th 2019
12:30 pm:

Friday, March 22nd 2019
12:30 pm:
Speaker: SPRING BREAK -- No seminar

Friday, March 29th 2019
12:30 pm:

Wednesday, April 3rd 2019
1:25 pm:
Speaker: Graeme Luke, McMaster University
Faculty Host: Martin Greven

Friday, April 5th 2019
12:30 pm:

Friday, April 12th 2019
12:30 pm:

Friday, April 19th 2019
12:30 pm:

Friday, April 26th 2019
12:30 pm:

Wednesday, May 1st 2019
1:25 pm:
Speaker: Jack Harris, Yale University
Subject: TBD
Faculty Host: Paul Crowell

Thursday, May 2nd 2019
3:35 pm:
Speaker: Jack Harris (Yale University)
Subject: TBD
Refreshments in atrium after the Colloquium.
Faculty Host: Paul Crowell

Friday, May 3rd 2019
12:30 pm:

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