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Kurt Wick and student

Playing with the building blocks of physics

When one imagines a room full of physicists in training, the image that comes to mind is perhaps not a group of students sitting around playing with Legos. But that is precisely the metaphor used by Kurt Wick to describe his classes in the Methods of Experimental Physics. The students do not play with actual interlocking colored bricks, but rather bits of computer systems that might fit together in larger experiments. More »

Priscilla Cushman

Priscilla Cushman

Exploration into the building blocks of matter through complementary approaches: (1) the most sensitive search for a direct signal from the dark matter halo surrounding our galaxy (the CDMS experiment in the Soudan Underground Laboratory in northern Minnesota), (2) the highest energy accelerator (The CMS experiment at the future Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland), and (3) the most precise measurement of the magnetic moment of the muon (g-2 at Brookhaven Lab in New York). More »

Keith Olive

Keith Olive

Keith Olive's research centers on particle physics and cosmology in the areas of: big ban nucleosynthesis, which is an explanation of the origin of the light element isotopes through 7Li; particle dark matter, specifically supersymmetric dark matter; big bang baryogenesis, which is an explanation of the matter-antimatter asymmetry observed in nature; and inflation, which is a theory constructed to resolve many outstanding problems in standard cosmology.

Marco Peloso

Marco Peloso

Professor Marco Peloso started his research career in theoretical particle physics. He soon became interested in the application of these studies to the field of cosmology. The physics of the early Universe deals with very high energies and, Peloso says, a lot of the tools and concepts from particle physics are useful in cosmology. The first area of Peloso’s interest is in the so-called “re-heating phase” of the early Universe. More »

Yong-Zhong Qian

Yong-Zhong Qian

"My laboratory is a supernova," Yong Qian states matter-of-factly with a smile. Qian is a theoretical physicist studying neutrino oscillations, the change from one "flavor" to another as a neutrino moves through matter and space. This phenomenon occurs because a neutrino is created in one of three flavor states (or simply “flavors”), with three distinct mass states. More »

Evan Skillman

Evan Skillman

Evan Skillman works in observational extragalactic astronomy. He is interested in problems concerning the formation and evolution of galaxies with emphasis on observations of dwarf galaxies. Though the observations of stellar populations of nearby galaxies (primarily with the Hubble Space Telescope)he is pioneering ways to reconstruct the star formation histories of nearby galaxies. More »

Liliya Williams

Liliya Williams

Most of Liliya William's work has to do with dark matter: measuring the amount, the spatial distribution on a wide range of astrophysical scales, from sub-galactic to super-cluster. Detailed knowledge of dark matter distribution will enable us to place constraints on the physical properties of dark matter particles. Another aspect of her research has to do with the dynamics of dark matter in galaxies and clusters. More »

Alexander Heger

Alexander Heger

I study the life and explosive death of massive stars and the origin of the elements, and am generally interested in nuclear astrophysics.I study massive and very massive stars (10-1000 solar masses); the first generations of stars in the universe (Pop III stars); evolution of rotating massive stars and the spin of their remnants; mixing and transport processes in the stellar interior; More »

Vuk Mandic

Vuk Mandic

Vuk Mandic is involved in searches for gravitational waves with LIGO. He co-chairs the LIGO group searching for the stochastic background of gravitational waves, which could be cosmological or astrophysical in origin. He is also involved in the studies of different noise sources that limit the performance of gravitational-wave detectors, and is leading a collaboration studying the possibility of building such a detector underground. More »

hanany

Shaul Hanany

We have a cool group of people in search for information about the origin of the Universe. We look for this information in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation, which is a relic remnant from the Big Bang. We have been using self-made balloon-borne telescopes that fly high above the planet to observe this radiation. We are now searching for signals that originated as early as 10-35 seconds after the big bang. More »


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